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How To Make Your Very Own Green Lion Salve

How To Make Your Very Own Green Lion Salve

One of the most underestimated treatments- topicals containing cannabis- are often tragically overlooked. It isn’t uncommon to suggest a salve or oil to someone in serious pain and be looked at like you just suggested putting a band-aid on a gunshot wound; however, it is often followed with a look of surprised relief, especially when using the Green Lion Salve.

The Victoria Cannabis Buyers Club‘s version of tiger balm, the Green Lion Salve creates both heating and cooling effects. It can be a very effective anti-inflammatory, bring some significant relief to soft tissue pain and for most people, this happens almost instantly…it also happens to be very reasonable and easy to make at home.

Please note: Green Lion Salve is not to be used on broken skin, if you are pregnant, or breastfeeding.

Ingredients:

  • Massage oil – At The VCBC, we use cannabis infused, cold pressed extra virgin olive oil
  • Essential Oils – Eucalyptus, Camphor, Menthol, Lavender, Tea Tree, Wintergreen, Cinnamon and Peppermint
  • Beeswax

How To Make Your Own Green Lion Salve:

We make (approx 7 x 4 oz’ bottles) from the above proportions

  1. Warm 1 Cup of Massage Oil
  2. Add Essential Oils (by the drop): 7 Eucalyptus, 7 Camphor, 6 Menthol, 9 Lavender, 7 Tea Tree, 7 Wintergreen and 6 Peppermint
  3. Stir all the the ingredients together
  4. Leave overnight
  5. Melt and stir
  6. Add 8 drops of Cinnamon Oil
  7. Add ⅓ -½ cup melted beeswax
  8. Stir and enjoy


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Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:04:14 +0000

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DOJ secretly using IRS to investigate Colorado marijuana businesses, lawsuit says

DOJ secretly using IRS to investigate Colorado marijuana businesses, lawsuit says

The U.S. Department of Justice is secretly using the Internal Revenue Service to conduct criminal investigations into otherwise legitimate marijuana businesses in Colorado under the guise of tax audits, lawyers for the companies say in an ongoing federal lawsuit.

The IRS called the allegations baseless and illogical, saying inquiries it is making for information from Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division are simply part of its efforts at verifying financial records in determining if businesses owe more tax.

The case in U.S. District Court filed by the owners of Rifle Remedies, a medical marijuana business in Silt, is one of several that challenge IRS subpoenas to MED seeking information about how much pot they’ve grown, to whom they’ve sold it, and when. The IRS said it has resorted to the tactic because businesses have refused to offer the information voluntarily.

Though properly licensed in Colorado to sell the drug, in the view of the IRS the companies are traffickers that violate the federal Controlled Substances Act that lists marijuana as an illegal narcotic. As such, the businesses cannot deduct expenses as other companies can, but before the agency can make that assessment, it must first determine the companies are actually selling pot.

Filings in the Rifle Remedies case allege a deeper conspiracy involving at least three federal agencies.

Lawyers for the companies did not immediately return messages, but have said in recent court filings they suspect the IRS is overstepping its auditing authority by conducting investigations for the DOJ. They claim the Drug Enforcement Administration has trained tax agents on how to investigate drug operations.

“The IRS is working jointly with the Department of Justice to investigate purported criminal activity of the taxpayers,” the lawyers — Greenwood Village attorneys James Thorburn and Richard Walker — wrote in a recent filing. “To this end, the IRS has converged on Colorado and is conducting mass audits of those it has determined to be unlawfully trafficking in controlled substances … dishing out summonses like candy …”

They say their clients would happily give the IRS what it wants, but only with a grant of immunity from prosecution.

They say the DEA and IRS held training sessions in March 2016, “where (IRS) agents were trained in criminal drug law investigator (sic) techniques,” but efforts to learn what actually transpired have been rebuffed.

“The depths of the IRS and DOJ joint effort is shrouded in secrecy,” they wrote, noting responses to their requests under the federal Freedom of Information Act have been repeatedly stalled.

The lawyers assert the conduct is the result of a 2016 law in which Congress prohibited the use of DOJ funds to prevent implementation of state medical marijuana laws. So because the DEA can’t conduct such an investigation, it is working through the IRS in the U.S. Treasury Department.

The IRS, DEA and MED do not comment on pending litigation and will not confirm the existence of any investigation.

The IRS called the assertion “baseless,” saying Rifle Remedies “appears to sell marijuana for recreational use,” and that the DEA doesn’t need the help.

“That the DEA is using the IRS to investigate … defies common sense,” the government said in a court filing. “If prosecution were truly the goal, it would be far simpler — and likely more effective — for the DEA to send a plainclothes agent to purchase marijuana from (Rifle Remedies) than to co-opt the IRS into issuing summons to MED for information about past years’ marijuana sales. (Rifle’s) underlying theory of this case lacks not only evidence, but logic.”

The IRS is trying to get its hands on Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Tracking Reporting Compliance system, or METRC, which follows every marijuana plant from seed to sale. The agency wants annual gross sales reports for 2014 and 2015, but apparently also information about who is buying from Rifle Remedies.

Until now, the IRS relied on pot businesses — growers, distributors and manufacturers — to concede they are selling the drug, which the lawyers say is tantamount to admitting to a federal crime. Once done, the IRS uses section 280E of the Revenue Code in denying any business tax deductions, a move that raises the business’s tax bill by multiples.

Businesses are able to deduct their cost of producing goods from the revenues generated, just like other businesses can, but cannot do more than that, a massive liability that leaves them with huge tax bills.

No hearings have been set on the case.

This story was first published on DenverPost.com

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 01 Sep 2017 21:44:54 +0000

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DOJ secretly using IRS to investigate Colorado marijuana businesses, lawsuit says

DOJ secretly using IRS to investigate Colorado marijuana businesses, lawsuit says

The U.S. Department of Justice is secretly using the Internal Revenue Service to conduct criminal investigations into otherwise legitimate marijuana businesses in Colorado under the guise of tax audits, lawyers for the companies say in an ongoing federal lawsuit.

The IRS called the allegations baseless and illogical, saying inquiries it is making for information from Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division are simply part of its efforts at verifying financial records in determining if businesses owe more tax.

The case in U.S. District Court filed by the owners of Rifle Remedies, a medical marijuana business in Silt, is one of several that challenge IRS subpoenas to MED seeking information about how much pot they’ve grown, to whom they’ve sold it, and when. The IRS said it has resorted to the tactic because businesses have refused to offer the information voluntarily.

Though properly licensed in Colorado to sell the drug, in the view of the IRS the companies are traffickers that violate the federal Controlled Substances Act that lists marijuana as an illegal narcotic. As such, the businesses cannot deduct expenses as other companies can, but before the agency can make that assessment, it must first determine the companies are actually selling pot.

Filings in the Rifle Remedies case allege a deeper conspiracy involving at least three federal agencies.

Lawyers for the companies did not immediately return messages, but have said in recent court filings they suspect the IRS is overstepping its auditing authority by conducting investigations for the DOJ. They claim the Drug Enforcement Administration has trained tax agents on how to investigate drug operations.

“The IRS is working jointly with the Department of Justice to investigate purported criminal activity of the taxpayers,” the lawyers — Greenwood Village attorneys James Thorburn and Richard Walker — wrote in a recent filing. “To this end, the IRS has converged on Colorado and is conducting mass audits of those it has determined to be unlawfully trafficking in controlled substances … dishing out summonses like candy …”

They say their clients would happily give the IRS what it wants, but only with a grant of immunity from prosecution.

They say the DEA and IRS held training sessions in March 2016, “where (IRS) agents were trained in criminal drug law investigator (sic) techniques,” but efforts to learn what actually transpired have been rebuffed.

“The depths of the IRS and DOJ joint effort is shrouded in secrecy,” they wrote, noting responses to their requests under the federal Freedom of Information Act have been repeatedly stalled.

The lawyers assert the conduct is the result of a 2016 law in which Congress prohibited the use of DOJ funds to prevent implementation of state medical marijuana laws. So because the DEA can’t conduct such an investigation, it is working through the IRS in the U.S. Treasury Department.

The IRS, DEA and MED do not comment on pending litigation and will not confirm the existence of any investigation.

The IRS called the assertion “baseless,” saying Rifle Remedies “appears to sell marijuana for recreational use,” and that the DEA doesn’t need the help.

“That the DEA is using the IRS to investigate … defies common sense,” the government said in a court filing. “If prosecution were truly the goal, it would be far simpler — and likely more effective — for the DEA to send a plainclothes agent to purchase marijuana from (Rifle Remedies) than to co-opt the IRS into issuing summons to MED for information about past years’ marijuana sales. (Rifle’s) underlying theory of this case lacks not only evidence, but logic.”

The IRS is trying to get its hands on Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Tracking Reporting Compliance system, or METRC, which follows every marijuana plant from seed to sale. The agency wants annual gross sales reports for 2014 and 2015, but apparently also information about who is buying from Rifle Remedies.

Until now, the IRS relied on pot businesses — growers, distributors and manufacturers — to concede they are selling the drug, which the lawyers say is tantamount to admitting to a federal crime. Once done, the IRS uses section 280E of the Revenue Code in denying any business tax deductions, a move that raises the business’s tax bill by multiples.

Businesses are able to deduct their cost of producing goods from the revenues generated, just like other businesses can, but cannot do more than that, a massive liability that leaves them with huge tax bills.

No hearings have been set on the case.

This story was first published on DenverPost.com

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 01 Sep 2017 21:44:54 +0000

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Best Vaporizer: Utillian 720 Vaporizer Review

Best Vaporizer: Utillian 720 Vaporizer Review

Thursday, July 20th, 2017

Utillian 720 Vaporizer Review

In this blog, we will go over the pros and cons of the Utillian 720 Vaporizer.

Utillian 720 Provided by: TVAPE.com

From the Sponsor

For The Ambitious Connoisseur: Convection heating, 8 preset temperatures, wax and herb compatibility and simple loading with the magnetic mouthpiece are just some of the ways the Utillian 720 enriches your vapor experience.

Features

  • Exterior Finish: Anodized Aluminum with Rubberized Finish
  • Temperature Settings: 170°C l 175°C l 180°C l 185°C l 190°C l 210°C l 215°C
  • Battery Capacity: 18650 Polymer lithium-ion 2100 mAh

Video Review of the Utillian 720 Vaporizer

Pros and Cons of the Utillian 720

Pros

  – Really quick heat-up time

  – Long battery life

  – Excellent flavor

  – Single-button operation

  – Works well with concentrates

  – Feels good in the hand

Cons

  Honestly, there no issues with this vaporizer to speak of.

FROM BUD: The Utillian 720 Vaporizer is one of my new favorites and I’m putting it into rotation as one of my “go to” vapes.

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Published at Thu, 20 Jul 2017 04:41:26 +0000

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CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000

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CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000

Comments closed

President Trump is a “Firm Believer in States’ Rights”, Says Press Secretary Sean Spicer

President Trump is a “Firm Believer in States’ Rights”, Says Press Secretary Sean Spicer

During today’s White House Daily Press Briefing, President Trump’s Press Secretary Sean Spicer confirmed that Trump is a “firm believer” in states’ rights.

Sean spicer

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer.

During the briefing the very first question related to transgender bathroom laws: “Can you give us an update on the administrations plans with regards to transgender bathrooms?”, the reporter asked.

Spicer replied by stating that the president is “a firm believer in states rights”. He ends his answer by claiming that “certain issues like this are not best dealt with at the federal level”

Although the question had nothing to do with marijuana, Trump continuing to be a “firm believer” in states’ rights on this issue is a good indication that he’ll take the same approach in regards to state-level cannabis laws.

The full press conference where these comments were made can be found below, or by clicking here:

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Thu, 23 Feb 2017 03:56:27 +0000

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